<< Further Exhibition Halls


Address:
1 Dunakanyar Blvd, 2000 Szentendre

Opening hours:
Can only be visited by prior appointment.

Phone:
+36 20 779 6657


Free entry.

Roman Lapidarium

The Roman Lapidarium is located between downtown Szentendre and Road 11. For over 400 years, from the second half of 1st century AD, the town played an important strategic role in the Danube bend as it was one of the most endangered parts of the limes, the border of Pannonia. A dense line of encampments and watchtowers protected the limes; a significant military power was present in the area that is today Szentendre, then called Ulcisia Castra. The craftsmen and merchants working for the military lived in the area of the canabæ west and south of the camps. The population of the Roman period was buried along the “limes-road,” the main road along the Danube leading towards Aquincum, but later a small, Early Christian tomb chapel was built, too, on the premises of the late Roman cemetery.

Transdanubia was organised as a province in the 1st century AD by the Roman Empire and was called Pannonia. From this time onwards the Danube bend played an important strategic role in military conquests for the next 400 years: this is where the boundaries of the Empire, the limes was, the most dangerous part of which constituted the area of the Danube’s elbow. A dense line of encampments and watchtowers protected the limes, and a significant military power was present in the area that is today Szentendre, then called Ulcisia Castra.

Ulcisia Castra remained an extremely militarized settlement throughout. Its camp was built on a small plateau near Bükkös Creek. The trapezoid-shaped fort of an area of 205 x 134 m was built in the first decade of the 2nd century.

The craftsmen and merchants working for the military lived in the area of the canabæ west and south of the camps. The population of the Roman period was buried along the limes-road, the main road along the Danube leading towards Aquincum, but later a small, Early Christian tomb chapel was built, too, on the premises of the late Roman cemetery.

In the 4th century, fearing for their dead due to the more and more frequent barbaric offenses, the residents established a cemetery near their supporting walls at the earlier location of the canabæ.
There was also a small, Early Christian tomb chapel on the premises of this late Roman cemetery.

Current Exhibition(s):

Currently no exhibition