THE LOST ASTRONAUT


Ferenczy Museum Center, together with the Municipality of the City of Szentendre, announced a public call for street art, public art and public sculpture projects to be temporarily realized on the square located in front of Post Office No. 1. Within the framework of the project, which was launched in 2016 and is planned to continue in the future, three artworks have been realized this year – one of which is, exceptionally, displayed in the courtyard of the Barcsay Museum.

 

Ottó Szabó’s lost astronaut can be viewed on the square as of 30 June. His search for his place calls to mind such questions as where is home, what counts as home, and what makes us feel like we are home.

2055

HOME/HOMELESSNESS


Ferenczy Museum Center, together with the Municipality of the City of Szentendre, announced a public call for street art, public art and public sculpture projects to be temporarily realized on the square located in front of Post Office No. 1. Within the framework of the project, which was launched in 2016 and is planned to continue in the future, three artworks have been realized this year – one of which is, exceptionally, displayed in the courtyard of the Barcsay Museum.

 

The installation by Péter Borbás DLA and Annamária Szentes consists of the interior of a conjured-up home, in which the spread family table is symbolized by a continuously refilled shopping cart. This interactive work has been created in the spirit of assuming social responsibility both in public art and in architecture. Please take care of, and around, the instal­ lation, relax and enjoy yourself – bon appétit!

2044

ISLAND


Ferenczy Museum Center, together with the Municipality of the City of Szentendre, announced a public call for street art, public art and public sculpture projects to be temporarily realized on the square located in front of Post Office No. 1. Within the framework of the project, which was launched in 2016 and is planned to continue in the future, three artworks have been realized this year – one of which is, exceptionally, displayed in the courtyard of the Barcsay Museum.

 

The keys incorporated into this sculpture were originally part of Chiharu Shiota’s installation entitled Rain of Memories, which was realized in Szent­ endre Gallery in 2016. They had been collected for the Japanese artist’s installation by residents in response to a call by Ferenczy Museum Center – and they now assume new form in Péter Heim’s work.

2050

POETIC PAINTER OF SZENTENDRE


He was called the poetic painter of Szentendre already in his lifetime. As Pál Deim once noted: if we want to know the mood and the colours of this small town by the Danube, we have to see the paintings of István Ilosvai Varga.
The artist, who was born in the Great Hungarian Plane, visited Szentendre first upon suggestion by an other painter, Géza Vörös. He remained enchanted by this town for his entire life. After arriving home from Paris, at the end of the 1920s he went to Nagybánya, but in vain: what he was looking for there, he has only found in Szentendre, where in 1935 he has settled down for good. However, he created his first works depicting characteristic details of the city with a strong dynamism of the colours and innovative angles, now indispensable parts of the history of Szentendre art, already during his first visits to the city.
It was a significant change in his art, when he turned from the wide horizon to landscape compositions in dark tones, on which narrow streets, framed by the walls of the houses, firewalls, emphasized by strong straight lines, niches and mews determine the lives of the figures (workers, day-jobbers and penniless people), who move between them. This was the moment when he has found his unique style: characteristic paintings, which dissolve in the harmony of colours. The only change to this style was a lighting up of the colours, what his contemporaries have called “stunning poems of colours” and has attributed partly to an inspiration from the artist’s legendary collections of butterflies and cactuses.
The exhibition, representing the rich collection of the Ferenczy Museum Center from works by István Ilosvai Varga, gives an insight into the oeuvre of the artists by highlighting characteristic compositions from his artistic periods.

1009

VERMILION SUNSET


In the short fifteen years of his fruitful career as an artist, between 1929 and 1944, Imre Ámos created a strong integrity of life and art: his belief in art became the main source of his strength, while the main source of his work was a vision-like depiction of the apocalyptic time that he lived in.

In his early years he painted idyllic multi-figure compositions in a timeless space: the characters of his pictures are gloomy women, heading to the well, and men of meditative calmness. After 1936–37, partly influenced by Marc Chagall, whom he personally met, his attention is drawn to the representation of “subjective dreams and visions”. He uses several symbols: the cock, the ladder, the angel and the fire are painterly metaphors, waiting for getting unfolded and decoded. Ámos’s unique human and artistic accomplishment is that he created even at a time when the human spirit seemed to get broken and went silent. As an inmate of forced-labour service camps, he drew his visions in spite of the depressing feelings of hopelessness, defencelessness and humiliation, balancing on the edge of existence. The months of forced labour have changed his painting: the colours became darker, the outlines of objects and human figures turned into squeezing chains.

Beyond his works of fine art, the written documents in his legacy contribute to the understanding of his personality and art, such as his early love letters to Margit Anna, his diary of 1935–44, his sketchbooks, the mailing-cards that he wrote from the camp, as well as his poems and notices.

Imre Ámos stepped over the depiction of the material world, and, transcending the reality, he revealed his intuitions, fears and prophetic visions through his complex symbols and associations. He strived, with all his strength, for leaving a sign with his writings and works to the succeeding generations about the inhuman age he lived in. His wife, Margit Anna fulfilled this wish and preserved his husband’s legacy as a life-long mission. She strived for making him acknowledged and eventually succeeded in giving him a rightful place in the history of Hungarian art.

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